TAE KWON-DO OATH 

AS A MEMBER OF TAE KWON-DO I DO SOLEMNLY PLEDGE TO ABIDE BY THE RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE TAE KWON DO FEDERATION.

TO STRIVE ALWAYS TO BE MODEST, COURTEOUS AND RESPECTFUL TO ALL MEMBERS AND IN PARTICULAR TO MY SENIORS.

TO PUT THE ART TO USE ONLY IN SELF DEFENCE OR IN DEFENCE OF THE WEAK AND NEVER TO ABUSE MY KNOWLEDGE OF THE ART.

CONDUCT IN THE DO-JANG

  • Before the class commences and when it finishes, form orderly lines facing the instructor, with the most senior student standing to the their right, and the remainder lining up from right to left in order of seniority..
  • Bow to the instructor at the proper distance
  • No jewellery may be worn during class.
  • No shoes to be worn in the Do-Jang at any time.
  • Finger and toenails must be kept clipped short and clean.
  • Dobok must be kept clean at all times.
  • When fixing your Dobok or belt do not face your instructor.
  • No horseplay, whistling or loud talking in the Do-Jang.
  • Never lose your temper in the Do-Jang, especially during sparring.
  • No talking during class except to ask a question.
  • Before asking a question raise your right hand to attract the instructors attention.
  • While in the Do-Jang, always address the instructor as Sir or Mr/Miss/Mrs using the instructors surname.
  • Students must behave in a disciplined manner while training.
  • No profanity will be used in the Do-Jang.
  • Respect all members of senior grade.
  • Any student who is late for class must get the instructors permission and bow to the instructor before joining the class.
  • Students should never leave class for a break, water or an early dismissal without permission.

 

 

10 POINTS TO BECOMING A GOOD TAE KWON-DO STUDENT

  • Never tire of learning. A good student can learn anywhere, anytime. This is the secret of knowledge.
  • A good student must be willing to sacrifice for his art and his instructor. Many students feel that their training is a commodity bought with monthly fees and are unwilling to take part in any demonstrations, teaching or work around the Do-Jang. An instructor can afford to lose this type of student.
  • Always set a good example to lower ranking students. It is only natural that they attempt to emulate their seniors.
  • Always be loyal and never criticise the instructor, Tae Kwon-Do or the teaching methods.
  • If an instructor teaches a technique, practice it and attempt to utilise it.
  •  A student's conduct outside the Do-Jang reflects on the art and the instructor.
  • If a student adopts a technique from another Do-Jang and the instructor disapproves, the student must discard it immediately, or train in the Do-Jang where it was learnt.
  • Never be disrespectful to the instructor.

 

TENETS OF TAE KWON-DO

 Courtesy – Ye Ui
Integrity – Yom Chi
Perseverance – In Nae
Self Control – Kuk Chi
Indomitable Spirit – Beakjul Boolgool

 

Courtesy        

 
Tae Kwon-Do students should attempt to practice the following elements of etiquette:

  • To promote the spirit of mutual concessions
  • To be ashamed of one’s vice, contempting that of others
  • To be polite to one another
  • To encourage a sense of justice
  • To distinguish the Instructor from student and senior from junior

Integrity

             In Tae Kwon-Do the word integrity means being able to distinguish right from wrong and have the conscience, if wrong, to feel guilt. Listed are some examples where integrity is lacking:

  • The instructor who misrepresents themselves and their art by presenting improper techniques to their students because of a lack of knowledge or apathy.
  • The student who misrepresents themselves by “fixing” breaking materials before demonstrations.
  • The Instructor who hides bad techniques with luxurious training halls and false flattery to his students.
  • The student who requests rank from an Instructor, or attempts to purchase it.
  • The student who gains rank for ego purposes or the feeling of power.
  • The Instructor that teaches and promotes his art for materialistic gains.

 

Perseverance

               There is an old oriental saying; “patience leads to virtue to merit”. One can make a peaceful home by being patient 100 times. Certainly happiness and prosperity are most likely brought to the patient person. To achieve something, whether it is a higher degree or the perfection of a technique, one must set his goal and then constantly persevere. One of the most important secrets in becoming a leader of Tae Kwon-Do is to overcome every difficulty by perseverance.

Self-Control

              This tenet is extremely important inside and outside the Do-Jang, whether conducting oneself in free sparring or in one’s personal affairs. A loss of self-control in sparring can prove disastrous to both student and opponent. An inability to live and work within one’s capability, or sphere, is also a lack of self-control.

Indomitable Spirit

             “Here lie 300 who did their duty”. A simple epitaph for one of the greatest acts of courage known to mankind. Although facing the superior forces of Xerxes, Leonidas and his 300 Spartans at Thermoplae showed the world the meaning of indomitable spirit. It is shown when a courageous person and his principles are pitted against overwhelming odds. A serious student of Tae Kwon-Do will at all times deal with the belligerent, without any fear or hesitation, with indomitable spirit regardless of whosoever or however many the number may be.

 

 

 
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